'Lost' album

Songlines
'Lost is like a series of musical equations that work their way through the ears into the mind, their rhythmic and melodic themes interweaving, rising and falling.   It feels by turn widescreen and microscopic.   It's subtle, uncluttered, minimal and extremely focusing, an album that is a thoroughly absorbing world of tension, suspension and release.'   Chosen for Songlines Top of the World.

Uncut
'An impressivley intricate affair.   Pairing two harps with autoharp, Moog, tone generators and Red Box, the results are both mesmeric and meditative. "Trace's rapidly plucked harp melodies sometimes recall Penguin Cafe Orchestra, and Highwire's dainty modular synth lines give way to quieter realms on the lullaby-esque "Carousel" and the atmospheric "Unseen".   Lost is inventive, immersive and steeped in a gratifying melancholy.

MC Net Italy
'FitkinWall's wonderfully contrasting melodies merge, fade and re-emerge with an amazing variety of colour, in a rich dialogue between electronica and classical.'

London Jazz News
'From eerie start in 'Trace' you feel disorientated, "a thousand twangling instruments hum" in your ears, the relentless drive ofthe concert harp broken only by the briefest of pauses.  The clarity of the sound and the easy flow of melodies disguise the often tricky time-signatures.   It would be wrong to describe Fitkin's music as minimal, he makes complicated sound easy.   Wire harp, concert harp and autoharp are overlaid with moog and bits of electronics.  The harp is luminous, pastoral and urban at the same time under Wall's fingers, she pushes the instrument to its limits and Fitkin's music allows for a certain steeliness and discordance making the harp sound contemporary.   The sound is immaculate.'

West Briton
'This hypnotic album manages the rare feat of being incredibly beautiful and at times unsettling.   Fitkin's trademark rhythmic interplay is balanced by Ruth's mesmerising and varied use of harp.    A sublime new album.'

Resident
'A beguilingly intimate album that is often dark and mesmeric.'